Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Post 2: Innovation Attributes

Post 2: Please choose an innovation that you are familiar with and rate it according to each of the five innovation attributes discussed by Rogers. How do these attributes affect the adoption rate in this particular case? Are there any other attributes that one may need to consider? Which one of the five seems to be the most important attribute?

21 comments:

Melissa said...

My innovation: DVR (digital video recorder; i.e. TiVo)

Relative Advantage: It's superior to the VCR as you can record any television show/movie/broadcast available to you without having to change video cassette tapes, set times, etc. It has many options like pausing and replaying live TV, recording one program while you watch another, and pre-schedule recordings. Some will remember your *favorite* shows and record them. It also provides a schedule of programs to make programming easier.

Compatibility: This innovation is very compatible with today's electronic culture, but not necessarily with advertisers as they feel it takes away from their campaigns.

Complexity: This innovation is fairy straight-forward and self-explanatory - it's not very complex to today's electronic user.

Trialability: If you go through a company, a trial offer may be available. Also, some companies (i.e. Mediacom) loan out the DVR equipment and do not have a contract. On the other hand, you may have to purchase such devices, like the TiVo.

Obersvability: Since the DVR is now so widespread, many friends and family members possess one (or more) and so they are very accessible and observable.

The biggest attribute here is the relative advantage this DVR has over regular television and VCR recording. Second most important being compatibility, followed by complexity, observability, and trialability. All the attributes work hand in hand to create a user-friendly, technology-driven television accessory. Because of the nature of this innovation, its attributes help it spread more easily.

Jo Jackson said...

For this post, I chose to revisit a product innovation I researched with a group in Marketing 447. Our research paper was about the MobileESPN phone that was introduced in 2006. This is a cell phone that caters specifically to sports fanatics.
The relative advantage of this phone is that its ammenities are geared towards individuals interested in sports. The phone has a sidebar menu that allows for quick access to teams, players, scores, stats, gamecasts, columns, fantasy teams, news (provided exclusively by ESPN), and videos. The phone also gives alerts, such a highlights and breaking news.
This device is compatible with social groups concerned with sports. An example of this niche would be athletes, agents, recruiters and coaches. It is also compatible to where the device fits busy lifestyles by providing internet access.
The device showed a moderate-to-low level of complexity. The target audience of this product are educated and have the ability to learn to use the phone in a short period of time. The sidebar menu innovation boasted ease of use during the product's inception.
It was difficult to try the phone without incurring high costs for the phone and the service plan, but the phone was available to see exclusively at Best Buy once it hit the market.
For the observability portion, the conclusions we came up with were that consumers were pleased with the information provided, but were not impressed with the "chunkiness" of the phone itself, its lack of bluetooth technology, its limited texting capabilities, its limited internet capabilities, poor battery life and its overall cost.
The adoption rate was slow because not all people are die-hard sports fanatics and the cost of the phone and service plans at the time of introduction. I would say the relative advantage played a major role with this innovation.

_ said...

My innovation is the Tablet PC. I first purchased a Tablet PC in 2005 when I worked as a Staff Writer at the Iowa State Daily.

Relative Advantage: The Tablet PC is superior to regular laptop computers. The cumulative effect of voice commands, handwriting recognition, recording and keyboard-less note taking give an incredible advantage for journalists doing their work on the fly.

It is possible to record an event, take notes, synchronize the notes with the recording to ensure an accurate quote, dictate the article on the drive home, and use voice commands to connect to the nearest wireless network and send your article. This speeds up the adoption rate.

Compatibility: For journalists always seeking to beat the competition, the Tablet PC combines multiple functions in a convenient package. It is compatible with the typical journalist-on-deadline ethic. This speeds up the adoption rate.

Complexity: This innovation uses the same Windows operating system that other PC's use. Learning to use the tablet pen as a means of input is relatively simple. This speeds up the adoption rate.

Trialability: One doesn't normally lease computers, regardless if they're Tablets or not. Besides in-store demonstrations, prospective adopters probably don't get a chance to try the innovation. Unfortunately, in-store demos aren't a true expression of the Tablet's utility in field work. This probably slows down the adoption rate.

Observability: I had not observed anyone using a Tablet before I decided to do so. Even though the prices have calmed down significantly since 2005, when I bought my first Tablet, they are still highly outnumbered by conventional PC's. This probably slows down the adoption rate.

The attribute most important to the Tablet PC's adoption is the relative advantage. As I started to cover more stories, I needed a better way of organizing my notes. Tablet functionality was the best possible way.

I can think of no other attributes that need to be considered. As was mentioned, cost is now highly comparable to most PC's.

Andrea said...

In response to the 60 Minutes clip watched in class yesterday regarding Nicholas Negropante's $100 laptop, I'm regretful that the segment lacked any discussion on true humanitarianism and imperialism (The practice of one country extending its control over the territory, political system, or economic life of another country). There were so many questions Leslie Stahl didn't bring up that felt so obvious to discuss:

Q. If Negropante's work is truly "humanitarian," why should he feel so angry about another company being able to accomplish his same goal for $x amount of dollars less?

Q. Is providing children in impoverished villages with laptops instead a year's worth of school supplies, water, or electricity, for example, really the best use of Negropante's money?

Q. And most importantly, is it necessary or even right to impose Western values (technology, money, speed) on another country that has never valued or needed these types of ideas in their culture ever? Why do we (Americans, typically), think other cultures can always be "improved" with just a little assistance?

Q. If Negropante wants to improve education among children so badly, why not teach disadvantaged American children about the educational tools that their own country has failed to teach them because they can't afford to do so themselves?

After first learning about imperialism as an undergrad, I can't help but think of the idea in almost EVERY situation involving the US and most foreign interactions of "assistance." While it's difficult to determine when you are being helpful and when you are trying to make another "like you," it's so important to step back and reassess what you're really doing.

So frequently, the US disagrees with the cultural practices of another country and therefore wants to step in and change things so the country runs more smoothly like ours (uh...the war?). We think we're fixing their "problem," but we really end up Westernizing their culture and demeaning their values.)

I am absolutely for more and better education in any country, but is giving children a laptop the best option? Probably not. Instead, maybe we could inquire about the VILLAGE'S needs before we impose OUR grand ideas. For them, maybe this includes better education for teachers or financial support to pay for hiring more teachers and fixing up current classrooms.

I'm not sure handing over a laptop and believing a child will "learn" what he or she needs to know to educate themselves in three minutes is what this village really wants.

As students in the field of communication and technology, there is no doubt we will encounter these types of situations in future careers. Clearly, involvement of excessive money can cause any business decision to be made poorly. I hate seeing corporate advertising and marketing "selling out" every good aspect of communication (look at "news" today, it's nearly nonexistent).

I really do think technology has incredible benefits and can revolutionize the world, but it will mean nothing down the road if it's ruined by incessant desperation to make a sale. But if students like us can recognize what's taking place regarding the communication and technolgy field, we CAN change it, we just need enough people to know what WE know.

While Negropante may not be profiting from his work, I think his value on money and speed in relation to technology are putting some of the villages receiving the computers at a disadvantage. And his anger regarding another company's stealing of his "baby" (a.k.a.: sale), causes me to think that this "great," "selfless" plan will ultimately do little good to actually educate children.

Etse Sikanku said...

The Olympus Digital audio recorder (specifically VN 3100 PC) is the innovation I’ll be focusing on. The voice recorder is a common tool for media persons. This was sort of the ‘textbook tool’ for most journalists I was working with across the country. At CITI fm my colleagues and i used to carry one at every time of the day-whether on duty or not-and some even joked that even during sleep we needed to carry one just in case something ‘news worthy’ came up.

Relative Advantage: The Olympus digital recorder is an improvement over other cassette recorders. It is small, can record for longer hours and has better sound quality. One does not need to keep purchasing empty cassettes in order to record and because it is so powerful it can record even from a fairly longer distance. Most can record for over 71 hours.

Compatibility: This recorder is certainly the journalist’s best friend especially for radio journalists. Because radio journalists deal more with voice than text or image as compared to print and TV, it is most compatible with their work. By the way it is modeled; it is also very sleek and portable. It is also compatible with computers as voice transfers can be done with a single cable.

Complexity: It is not difficult at all to use this device. Indeed it s non-complexity serves the purpose very well because politicians and other news subjects will never suspect you if you did have it on. Most people are always very careful when TV cameras focus on them or when newsmen scribble things during an interview. But this recorder one can always be hidden whiles doing a recording. It therefore does not disrupt the whole interview process and can be used to capture very important information from unsuspecting people.

Observability- During press conferences and other media events it is common to see the Olympus digital recorders in use. Hardly a day passes by without seeing the device in use. Even for those who aren’t able to go to the field, it is common to see the recorder on TV for instance when press conferences are covered or when scenes of journalists covering events are shown. The results of this are always noticed when sound bites are played on radio.

Trialability-Companies have targeted journalists directly and have special offers in which they get to try the recorders before buying them. However often it is not common to test before buying.

One attribute that fascinates me is the ability to easily transfer the recorded voices unto a computer to be further developed into sound bites for news bulletins. The same process can be used for creating comprehensive news reports or features.

Out of the five I think the relative advantage of this device over other traditional methods of news recording is the most important. Scribbling notes in a jotter is hardly the most accurate way of making recordings. Complexity features strongly as well. As mentioned the innovation is very easy to use-not too complex.

There was one investigative journalist in Ghana who was able to record the detailed conversation of the ruling party’s (New Patriotic Party-NPP) chairman whiles he was in a hearty conversation of how they deliberately looted government coffers and stole state money. When it was first reported the party Chairman Haruna Esseku denied the allegations for a very long time until sound bites were played on air implicating him. That year Raymond Archer from The Enquirer won the investigative journalist of the year. It was also the year in which Haruna Esseku’s political career came to an abrupt end.

_ said...

I'm with Andrea on this. I'm not sure that a computer will solve Nero's problems. When the proverbial house is afire, resources need to be addressed to solve the more basic problems of hunger and malnutrition.

As long as those problems are lingering around, I'm not so sure that worrying about hundred-dollar laptops is necessarily the most "humanitarian" thing to do.

Secondly, I'm not so sure how well these computers will be utilized by their audiences. It seems entirely plausible to me that these audiences would re-invent the innovation and turn it into a glorified toy, a light source, or some other-such thing that wouldn't truly utilize its potential.

Scott Schrage -- Program Assistant said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Scott Schrage -- Program Assistant said...

The XBox 360 is a video game console that has now been in existence for several years.

Relative Advantage: Because a new generation of game consoles is typically released every half-decade or so, it is of the utmost importance that the current batch (now including the XBox 360) demonstrate far greater advantage than their last-generation counterparts -- if they do not, the game-playing audience might very well wait a few years for the next generation.

Having said that, relative advantage is often judged in terms of graphical power (how pretty are its games?), processing speed (how quickly can they run?), sound quality (does it take of advantage of my new 7.1 audio set-up?), and, more recently, the online network connecting the owner to his/her counterparts. The Xbox 360's games are far more visually impressive than the last generations', has far more processing speed and memory capacity, utilizes more advanced sound technology, and has crafted XBox Live, an online network that allows its users to easily locate, chat with (via text or a headset), and play games with friends established either via standard social systems or XBox Live itself. These traits undoubtedly facilitated the adoption of the console.

Compatibility: Most game consoles are inherently compatible with the audience they seek to reach, as that audience typically possesses a great deal of game-playing experience. This means that the XBox 360 was (for the most part) compatible with the audience's expectations; however, the price of the console (initially $400) was more than the previous few generations' consoles, which may very well have slowed the adoption. Price is always a key component of consoles, as the recently released PS3 (which initially sold for $600) was certainly incompatible with most gamers' socio-economic status, thus greatly slowing its own adoption.

Complexity: The complexity of the XBox 360 (and its brethren) is certainly an issue that has slowed its adoption among those not accustomed to playing games; this is an issue that has been more successfully addressed by Nintendo's recently released system, the Wii. However, for the traditional gaming population, the XBox 360 poses few concerns; the system still utilizes a controller (whose format is extremely similar to previous models) and emphasizes software that is (in most cases) only slightly more complicated than previous editions. These similarities mean that the console is not viewed as complex by the majority of its audience, thereby speeding its adoption rate.

Trialability: Upon their release, many console manufacturers set up trial stations within the outlets selling their technology; Microsoft is no exception. When releasing the XBox 360, the company introduced its system to gamers by giving them the opportunity to play in-store game demos. This is a crucial aspect of an industry in which "look but don't touch" simply does not cut it. The ability of gamers to try out the system prior to (and even after) its release was a critical part of increasing its rate of adoption.

Observability: When a gamer purchases a new console, one of his/her first moves is to invite friends over to see it. In most cases, this is probably a show of social status; regardless, the outcome is the same: Gamers are able to observe the product before making the decision of whether to buy it. The fact that the XBox 360 and its games were heavily marketed via television and the Internet -- which is incredibly fertile ground for such a tech-savvy audience -- only gave potential consumers even more opportunities to witness the new console. Again, this helps to facilitate adoption.


Overall, I would consider relative advantage (surprise!) to be the most important of the five diffusion factors. The distribution model for video game consoles is well-developed and standardized enough that the other factors -- compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability -- which might prove to be of greater importance in other markets, prove to be of smaller consequence here. For instance, Sony's Playstation 3 is also relatively compatible with gamers' expectations, no more complex than the XBox 360 (or other consoles), and has provided the same opportunities for trialability and observability as its industry counterparts. Thus, the rate of adoption for it -- and the XBox 360 -- comes down to the perceived relative advantage of the hardware itself.

Scott Schrage -- Program Assistant said...

I thought it was very prudent of Melissa to mention the fact that advertisers are not keen on DVR technology. In fact, I have heard of instances in which advertisers change their commercial-creation strategies in order to accommodate the introduction of DVR's. For instance, some ad agencies have been encouraging companies to reduce the number of frames they utilize in an advertisement; whereas it was previously an industry standard to change frames every few seconds (in order to keep the viewer engaged), this technique does not lend itself to a technology that fast-forwards through ads. Instead, some companies have been working to create commercials that consist of fewer frames (most of which emphasize their brand names), which might appear long enough for a viewer to get a decent impression of the ad -- or, if nothing else, the opportunity to view the company's name for more than a split-second.

Xiaomin Qian said...

I'd like to choose GPS(the global positioning system) as my topic.

Relative advantage: Using Earth orbit satellites to transmit precise micromave signals, GPS enables a receiver to determine its location, speed and direction. Because it is the only fully functional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), it allows people to use it at any point on the Earth under any weather condition.
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System)
It has many advantages compared with guiding by maps. When people take a trip, they don't need to buy several cities' maps where they will go to. GPS has a system which contains huge amount of maps. Sometimes, people feel confused where they are, GPS can tell the position. When driving, GPS tells turn left or right at which point, reminds changing lanes before turn, forecasts how many hours will arrive on the destination. When I travelled to
Yellowstone this summer, I even used GPS to find the nearest gas station and restaurant from my position while driving on the freeway. Even if I missed a turn, GPS can recalculate. These advantages speed up its rate of adoption.

Compatibility: GPS has no big conflict with existing values and culture. Normally, people in
this industry society can accept this innovation.

Complexity: It is easy to use GPS. Simply, Follow the direction, touch the touch-screen. Everybody who knows how to use a computer can easily operate GPS. For those who think computer is complex may learn how to use GPS in a few minutes. Low complexity is good for its diffusion speed.

Trailability: If people go through a GPS store, sales man may show how it works. People may have opportunity to experience it. Some company also promise if a consumer dissatisfied with their products, they can be returned in a week. This can reduce potential adopters' uncertainty and help increase the rate of adoption.

Observability: GPS was first developed for military use. In the late 1990s, it began to use in civilian area. Now it is not difficult for people to see a GPS unit in friends' cars. This also reduces uncertainly of potential adopters.

Besides these five main attributes, I think price influences the adoption rate of GPS a lot. The price of GPS is still high. The expensive one may cost more than $1600. Normally, the price is between $200 to $500, few can be found around $100, but the quality is not as good as other's. I stopped struggling untill this summer, because the price fell. The price factor may block the adoption rate.

Relative advantage is the most important attribute in this case. People buy GPS mostly because of its powerful functions. For me, I am not worry about being lost with GPS in my car.

Etse Sikanku said...

I beg to differ with Andrea on the issue of Imperialism. First imperialism is an old forgotten ideology which had attained household popularity during the struggle for independence by several countries. I do not deny that it still exists in other ways but providing laptop computers to villages may not be a total definition of imperialism in it the way it was first used. Remember that technological developments are increasing by the day and anything that will help the under developed world catch up is most welcome. What if Negroponte decided NOT to do what he is doing?

That said I do agree that the questions you raised are really relevant ones. It brings into perspective the whole issue of new technologies and their adaptability by different societies. How would one expect that an innovation that was developed in the West would be easily adapted by people in the other parts of the global divide? Nicholas Negroponte's $100 computers are a perfect idea but wouldn’t a more skills based project serve them better by equipping them with the skills to produce a technology of their own kind which will better suit their environment? Would it be better in the long term if villagers are given lifelong skills that will help them produce self sufficient technology to fulfill their most basic needs instead of always waiting on the benevolence of some philanthropists?

Andrew Muenda a prominent Ugandan journalist once asked “What man or nation has ever become rich by holding out a begging bowl?" Will Negroponte and his philanthropic agencies go ahead to hand down overhead projectors, video recorders, cameras and any new technologies to the impoverished world as well? The key thing here is self sufficiency. Self sufficiency in production as well as consumption. Developing countries must be helped with this goal in mind. As we’ve realized embarking on a generous yet overly ambitious projects such as that of Negroponte cannot really stay for long. The market forces and business community will crush it. Helping poor people develop their own innovations will be the way to go.

By the way maybe some efforts should also be directed towards the possible negative consequences. Technological innovations could have some negative consequences and people can use it in ways that it was never meant to be used. In this way kids wouldn’t be using Google for the wrong reasons.

Melissa said...

I'm noticing that everyone's innovation is a high-tech electronic device of some sort. It's interesting to see how big a part technology plays in our lives from the entertainment of the XBox and DVR to the more practical Tablet PC. Technology seems to be the wave of the future in all realms.

Let's think about this, what's the latest innovation you've adopted that hasn't been technology driven??

Melissa said...

Here in the US our technology grows on a day by day basis. Even children in certain parts of the US don't have access to a computer at school. I grew up in Atlanta, GA and didn't even really know what a computer was until my family moved to Iowa. Because of this I was forced, literally, to catch up on typing skills and speeds and was expected to teach and familiarize myself in a short period of time to the level of my fellow classmates who had been using computers for quite a while.

What I'm trying to convey is that it's quite difficult to go from not having a need or want to being expected to need and want something that you aren't familiar with or don't feel comfortable using and accepting. The release of Negroponte's laptop into remote villages that lack electricity, clean water, good education, etc. is forcing an unfamiliar technology on a society that isn't prepared and doesn't know how to responsibly use the innovation. This in itself is an irresponsible solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

I have many things stuck in my mind from the 60 Minutes interview, one being that most kids' first English word (or first word, even) is "Google." That's just not right. Negroponte also says that kids are taking their computers home to "teach their families." Most kids I know surf the net looking for "educational games" to play.

And speaking of the internet on these laptops...other than the internet being the only means of exploring the outside world, why is it so important for their education?

Here are my observations:
1. From the interview, the capabilities of the laptops are not SHOWN as an educational asset.
2. Who is incurring the extra costs of satellite, generators, SOFTWARE, etc.?
3. How can children actually LEARN from a computer if they can't first read or can't comprehend the material? Negroponte says it's "school in a box." If that was the case, why am I in grad school?? Can I just go out and buy a computer and tell the Greenlee School I'm learning...?
4. Negroponte is very defensive about his "baby." Why? If there really isn't something in it for him, then why is he so adverse to teaming up with a company who is often leading in computer technology and has more than enough money to fund a project? Is it the glory he's worried about losing?

I agree with Samuel, Etse, and Andrea on most of their points. Too many things don't add up and there are just too many things to say about it, and there are too many problems that can't be solved with on laptop per child.

Erin O'Gara said...

The innovation that I am writing about is the iPod, a portable audio music player that has been on the market for five or six years.

Relative Advantage - before purchasing my iPod, I relied on CD’s to listen to music. While I really don’t know if there is much of an advantage in the actual sound quality of the iPod over CD’s, what was such an advantage to me was the size and simplicity of the iPod. (I should add that after I got my iPod I also got an adapter for my car so I could listen to my music through my CD player) Having one small device that contained more music than an entire folder of CD’s saved space, and was really convenient for me when I wanted to listen to music while working out.

Compatibility - After I got my iPod I also bought an adapter so that I was able to listen to all the music in my car. The main time that I use my iPod is when I am working out, and the size of the small device is far superior to the bulky CD headphone set.

Complexity - for someone like myself who is in no way technologically savvy, the iPod was relatively simple. It took a little while for me to get the hang of adding new music, but the step-by-step directions and Customer Service made the process relatively simple, even for someone who struggles with technological devices.

Trialability - conveniently, the iPod was something that diffused relatively quickly and even though I purchased mine not too long after they had been released, I already knew several people who had them. I was able to discuss, look at, and even try friend’s iPods which made my decision to purchase one much easier.

Observability - since I knew several people who already had iPods and was able to try them for myself before actually buying one, the level of observability was very high.

In the case of my iPod, I think that the two most important attributes were the relative advantage and the trialability. I think that each of the five attributes worked together to speed up the diffusion process, which apparently worked well since this innovation was adopted pretty quickly by a large number of people.

Erin O'Gara said...

In response to the Negropante comments - I have to say that I agree a little more with Etse, but I absolutely see how Andrea questioned his real intentions with the laptops. I also agree with Andrea that there are a lot of ways in which his time and resources could be more effectively used in these impoverished countries, but I don’t necessarily think that he truly has an interest in making a profit.

Negropante may not save the world, but I think that what he is doing is commendable nonetheless.

Xiaomin Qian said...

I quite agree with Andrea's comments about Negropante's $100 laptops. I want to say something from the point of innovation diffusion.
First, relative advantage. Of course computer is useful. But the video never showed children accessing to internet, instead they played several educational games. If these laptops can't access to the internet in the poor village, the function of the laptops were reduced. Negropante provided hardware to the children, then how about software? Will he also donate or ask these children to buy later?
Second, compatibility. The village even has no electricity. Maybe the children need text books, shoes or lunch more than laptops.
Third, complexity. Giving children laptops without any instructions can't educate them well. Maybe after They tired of playing computer games, the laptops will be left at a cornor becoming a decoration.
For trailability and observability. There is almost impossible for the children to know a loptop before.
In sum, Negropante is not good at diffusing an innovation on matter he is a philanthropist or a bussinessman. I question how long will these laptops be used by those kids? Will these laptops really help the children get knowledge and explore outside world?

_ said...

Scott, I'd think some of the relative advantage comes from Microsoft's product selection. No way you're going to play Halo 3 or NCAA 08 on the original Xbox.

Jo Jackson said...

I think that the rest of the innovation attribute always go back to relative advantage because one has to decide on if the idea, value or product is superior to what is currently adopted. In tying this into what we discussed about Muslims and birth control, since the product is not compatible to Muslim customs, birth control does not have a relative advantage on what is being practiced by Muslims now. Does that make sense?

Aother thing that ticked me off about the 60 Minutes segment is that for Americans to buy the computer, they must incur the cost of an extra unit to be sent to a third world country. Assuming that many low socioeconomic people will purchase this devise in the US, isn't it unfair to force them into paying for someone else "education"?

Andrea said...

Erin's mention of the car adapter she bought after she purchased her ipod was interesting. I know several people who have done the same because being able to listen to your music in your car really just extends the benefits you get from the initial ipod purchase. I suppose this could almost be seen as a re-invention. Purchasing the car adapter re-invents the ipod into not just a personal music player which one person hears traditionally through headphones, but it also becomes a way to play music out loud (without the use of headphones) to several people in your car.

It's also interesting that you can purchase this adapter from an off brand, which the ipod then makes no money from. But, having the ability to do so, gives the ipod an advantage because it's just one more reason, and an efficient reason at that, to make the initial purchase.

Eva said...

My familiar innovation is Digital Camera.I got one three years before, also I tried other brand of digital camera. They all have their advantage and be updated quickly. I consider it to be much more useful convenient, efficient and easy to handle.

Relative advantage: The digital camera saves a lot of time and effort because it is convenient to connect the camera to computer and then upload all the pictures to computer, it doesn't need to develop the film. Second, it is economic. You may save some money from buying films and develop the film. Also, you can delete the photos which you don't satisfied with and need not to care about the wasting film. Otherwise, more and more people prefer to use digital camera now, it is a symbol of digital area. So young people may use digital camera instead of traditional one.

Compatibility: A camera user who is used to sending a large number of pictures over the Internet might realize that the digital camera would be more suitable for his/her needs than a regular one. Thus, he/she might realize that there would be a number of benefits associated with the digital camera (e.g. in terms of saving time, reduced effort, better picture quality). Besides, there is graphics software which helps to beautify or specify the photos, and this is what we can't get from traditional camera.

Instead of buying a digital camera, some people prefer a more traditional innovative camera with new features, which is easier for them to comprehend and to which to associate benefits. Except for digital camera, I also take lomo--the fish eye in journey(one kind of special wide-angle lens) which is a traditional but bringing unexpected results camera.

Complexity: Digital camera is easy to learn and have clear guidance of operation. It is much more simple to take a good picture than the traditional one, for it has screen which helps to preview the later shot; some digital function will make the photos more perfect. Also the basic operation is as the same as the traditional camera. It doesn't need too much technology and knowledge. Therefore, the less complexity it has, the rate of adoption rises more rapidly.

Trialability: Sometimes, you can borrow one digital camera from one friend for trial use. Mostly, when you go buying a digital camera, you can definitely try it in the shop. The salesman will answer all your questions and help you to try the camera.

Observability: The popular use of digital product is obvious. It seems like we are living in a digital society. Most families purchase digital camera and use them instead of the traditional one. It is good for family use as well.

Eva said...

My familiar innovation is Digital Camera.I got one three years before, also I tried other brand of digital camera. They all have their advantage and be updated quickly. I consider it to be much more useful convenient, efficient and easy to handle.

Relative advantage: The digital camera saves a lot of time and effort because it is convenient to connect the camera to computer and then upload all the pictures to computer, it doesn't need to develop the film. Second, it is economic. You may save some money from buying films and develop the film. Also, you can delete the photos which you don't satisfied with and need not to care about the wasting film. Otherwise, more and more people prefer to use digital camera now, it is a symbol of digital area. So young people may use digital camera instead of traditional one.

Compatibility: A camera user who is used to sending a large number of pictures over the Internet might realize that the digital camera would be more suitable for his/her needs than a regular one. Thus, he/she might realize that there would be a number of benefits associated with the digital camera (e.g. in terms of saving time, reduced effort, better picture quality). Besides, there is graphics software which helps to beautify or specify the photos, and this is what we can't get from traditional camera.

Instead of buying a digital camera, some people prefer a more traditional innovative camera with new features, which is easier for them to comprehend and to which to associate benefits. Except for digital camera, I also take lomo--the fish eye in journey(one kind of special wide-angle lens) which is a traditional but bringing unexpected results camera.

Complexity: Digital camera is easy to learn and have clear guidance of operation. It is much more simple to take a good picture than the traditional one, for it has screen which helps to preview the later shot; some digital function will make the photos more perfect. Also the basic operation is as the same as the traditional camera. It doesn't need too much technology and knowledge. Therefore, the less complexity it has, the rate of adoption rises more rapidly.

Trialability: Sometimes, you can borrow one digital camera from one friend for trial use. Mostly, when you go buying a digital camera, you can definitely try it in the shop. The salesman will answer all your questions and help you to try the camera.

Observability: The popular use of digital product is obvious. It seems like we are living in a digital society. Most families purchase digital camera and use them instead of the traditional one. It is good for family use as well.